Philippine Scouts Heritage Society   Welcome, Guest. Please Login
  News:
Welcome to the Philippine Scouts Heritage Society Message Board. If you would like to register to be able to post to the message board please email us at webmaster@philippine-scouts.org and give us a username you would like to use. We have been experiencing a significant amount of spam registrations and this seems like the best solution to fix this. Thank you!
  HomeHelpSearchLogin  
 
Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII (Read 8307 times)
Sue Trout
Guest




Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
May 18th, 2004, 11:52pm
 
I need verification to an important WWII story about the deeds of Capt. B.C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, whose name in my childhood's auditory memory is  “Tommy LaBangbang.”   I recently told my mother's story of Tommy to author Richard Seron, who wants verification of the story for publication. Richard's contact information is at the bottom.

For this story to be possible, Tommy must have worked with the Philippine underground,  and the only way I can think for that to be possible, is Tommy must have been a Philippine Scout.  
 
Mother, Lt Frankie T Lewey, USANC, was one of the Angels of Bataan who was captured on Corrigedor, and held POW at Santo Tomas for 3 years. These are the few things I know from her, about Tommy.
Tommy's name
He was a US Army captain
He was a  pilot
13 June 1945 he mailed his portrait with return address at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, TX, to my mom at McClosky (Army) Hospital in Temple, TX.  (I have the photo of Tommy available in email format, if any one wants it to help remember who Tommy was, email me and I will send it.)

This is  what I remember hearing about Tommy and I hope someone knows this story and will add the details and corrections to it so it can be published.  

This took place while Frankie was a POW, interned at Santo Tomas, Manila, P.I.
Tommy was a pilot who communicated, from outside Santo Tomas, with my mother, who was inside Santo Tomas.
The Nurses needed drugs for their patients at  Santo Tomas.
Tommy would get those drugs and arrange for them to be smuggled into Santo Tomas.
When the drugs came in, Mom looked for Tommy's wings. (I think she told me the wings were pins.) If his wings were present, the drugs were safe to give. If drugs arrived without Tommy's wings, they were  not from Tommy and  were probably unsafe.  
When drugs were needed, Mom sent Tommy's wings out from Santo Tomas to be returned to him. (How she sent them out, through what channels, are things I do not know.)

That is the story I need verification/correction of, and details that are missing, to be added in, would be a real treasure. If someone recognizes the story or Tommy, (or has information about the men of the Flying Column ) please contact the author,
Richard Seron
15 Ferriter St
Quincy, MASS 02169-1006
Telephone: 617-472-8751  time zone -5 GMT,   Eastern Time

Rick has given his  permission to post  his name, address and phone.

Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:45pm by Editor-at-Large »  
  IP Logged
Editor-at-Large
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 421
Ohio
Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #1 - May 20th, 2004, 4:13pm
 
The following is an edited version of a reply provided by Federico Baldassarre of the Battling Bastards of Bataan[fred23@battlingbastardsbataan.com].  

Q: For this story to be possible, Tommy must have worked with the Philippine underground,  and the only way I can think for that to be possible, is Tommy must have been a Philippine Scout.

A: If he worked in the underground, in a capacity in which he was helping POWs or civilian internees, it would be more probable that he was a civilian, rather than a scout.  The military men who became guerrillas were responsible for making sure that the Filipinos remained "Pro-American", that provisional governments were set up, and they were responsible for Coast Observation, reporting to Australia Japanese ship movements.  They were not to do anything else, as ordered by MacArthur, by way of Chick Parsons.

Most of the smuggling of drugs and food into POW camps was done by Catholic Priest and their assistants, not by guerrillas.  In truth, their success has been exaggerated.   Most of the smuggling was done by civilians, not by guerrillas.  The Nips were aware that the Philippines was a devoutely catholic country, so they, at first, allowed members of the catholic clergy liberties they would not allow anyone else.

Q: Mother, Lt Frankie T Lewey, USANC, was one of the Angels of Bataan who was captured on Corrigedor, and held POW at Santo Tomas for 3 years. These are the few things I know from her, about Tommy.  Tommy's name He was a US Army captain He was a  pilot.

A: To my knowledge, and I could be wrong, there were no Scouts who were Pilots.

Q:  This took place while Frankie was a POW, interned at Santo Tomas, Manila, P.I.

Tommy was a pilot who communicated, from outside Santo Tomas, with my mother, who was inside Santo Tomas.  The Nurses needed drugs for their patients at  Santo Tomas.  Tommy would get those drugs and arrange for them to be smuggled into Santo Tomas.  When the drugs came in, Mom looked for Tommy's wings. (I think she told me the wings were pins.) If his wings were present, the drugs were safe to give. If drugs arrived without Tommy's wings, they were  not from Tommy and  were probably unsafe.

When drugs were needed, Mom sent Tommy's wings out from Santo Tomas to be returned to him. (How she sent them out, through what channels, are things I do not know.)


A: Up until, late September, 1944 (Santo Tomas was liberated on Feb 3, 1945, the gates of Santo Tomas were open to the public.  Anyone could come into the camp and bring in anything.  Also, internees who needed to tend to their business outside of the camp, were given passes for up to 2 weeks, to tend to their business.  Santo Tomas was not a POW camp, like Camp O'Donnell.  The internees who were sick and who needed medical attention were allowed to go to hospitals in Manila.  There was no smuggling of drugs involved, or anything else done here.

What happened to Santo Tomas is what happened to Manila.  By late 1944, Manila became Stalingrad, the US Army, Navy, and Air Corp had Manila completely besieged.  Nothing was getting in or out of Manila.  Manila went hungry and Santo Tomas was in Manila.

Q: That is the story I need verification/correction of, and details that are missing, to be added in, would be a real treasure. If someone recognizes the story or Tommy, (or has information about the men of the Flying Column ) please contact the author,

A: The "Flying Column" was the nickname of the 1st Cavalry, whose tanks crashed into the gates of Santo Tomas, on Feb 3, 1945, at around 6:30 PM.  I can get you in contact with several survivors.

The Manila Hotel Orchestra would play every Sunday at Santo Tomas for their weekly dance.   44 babies were born in Santo Tomas.  They had ballet recitals. They had a softball league and the Jap commandant was one of the star pitchers.  I can go on and on.....  It was not Camp O'Donnell, trust me.  44 babies were born in Santo Tomas, so yes, they had sex in that camp.

Almost all the 24 deaths which occurred in Santo Tomas came on Feb 7, when they were caught in an artillery cross-fire, between the Japs and the US Army, many shells fell into the compound.

The Japs closed the gates of Santo Tomas, when there was nothing left to smuggle from Manila, into Santo Tomas.   Manila was no longer a source for food, medicine, or anything else.  It was a city under siege, starving to death.

Editors note:  The literature on the Philippine Scouts does not indicate any Scout was an Army Air Corps pilot in World War II.  Although several internees were killed and wounded when the Japanese shelled Santo Tomas following its liberation, there also were at least three groups of male internees executed by the Japanese at various times.
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:45pm by Editor-at-Large »  

Newsletter Editor
  IP Logged
Sue Trout
Guest




Re:name found:  Cabaugbaug =Bartolomeo Cabang
Reply #2 - May 21st, 2004, 2:07am
 
I just received a message that my B. C. Cabaugbaug  is Capt Bartolomeo Cabangbang and tha t was found from my phonetic Labangbang. (on the envelope I have, the script letter n looks like the coontemporary script letter u).
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:46pm by Editor-at-Large »  
  IP Logged
Rainbow Trout  aka Sue
Full Member
***
Offline

Joy comes in the
morning

Posts: 125
Washington
Re: Capt Bartolomeo Cabangbang
Reply #3 - May 21st, 2004, 2:28am
 
Tommy is Capt Bartolomeo Cabangbang

I was so excited to have the right name that I forgot to ask for information.  Hoping Tommy is alive, does any one know him, or his family?

Please email me. Sue - rainbowtrout1@earthlink.net
Back to top
 
 
WWW emerald_trout@yahoo.com   IP Logged
Rainbow Trout  aka Sue
Full Member
***
Offline

Joy comes in the
morning

Posts: 125
Washington
Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang/ FRED p
Reply #4 - May 21st, 2004, 3:09am
 
The following is an edited version of a reply provided by Federico Baldassarre of the Battling Bastards of Bataan[fred23@battlingbastardsbataan.com].  
A: The "Flying Column" was the nickname of the 1st Cavalry, whose tanks crashed into the gates of Santo Tomas, on Feb 3, 1945, at around 6:30 PM.  I can get you in contact with several survivors.
~  ~  ~  ~  ~
YES please, Fred! I know how to reach Col. Walter Landry,  and all other names,  except one, are lost to me. That would be wonderful.

That brings up another question maybe you are able to answer; do you know a Sgt John Gallagher, or his family?

My father, Lt Francis Jerrett, was with the 1st. He was at the battle at Far Eastern University where he  was "slightly wounded" - according to the telegram sent to his brother. ("Slightly wounded" - that should be nominated for one of the top ten understatements of all time.) I think it was Sgt Gallagher who saved him from certain death.
Sue - rainbowtrout1@earthlink.net
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:50pm by Editor-at-Large »  
WWW emerald_trout@yahoo.com   IP Logged
Editor-at-Large
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 421
Ohio
Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #5 - May 21st, 2004, 4:28pm
 
I was acquainted with a Fred Gallager quite a few years ago here in Tucson. The one I knew was born and raised in Zamboanga City was incarcerated in Santo Thomas, came to the States after the war, lived in Tucson then in California. If it is the same Gallagher, he has been dead for several years.    Clyde

clydee@juno.com
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:50pm by Editor-at-Large »  

Newsletter Editor
  IP Logged
Chris Schaefer
Guest




Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #6 - May 22nd, 2004, 3:59pm
 
Captain Bartolomeo Cabangbang was not a Philippine Scout.  He started the war as a Second Lieutenant in the Philippine Army Air Corps, assigned to the 6th Pursuit Squadron (P-26s), which was inducted into the U.S. Far East Air Force and was commanded by Captain Jesus Villamor.

The 6th Pursuit Sqdn retreated to Bataan with the rest of USAFFE, to Cabcaben Airfield, after its planes were destroyed.  About March 1942, Cabangbang was trasferred to Corregidor and assigned to the Marines.  He was wounded by Japanese artillery fire and put in the hospital in Malinta Tunnel.

After the surrender of Corregidor, the Prisoners of War were taken to Camp O'Donnell.  In August 1942, after the American prisoners were transferred to Cabanatuan, Cabangbang and about 2000 other Filipinos were paroled and assigned to the Japanese' Bureau of Constabulary.  He was transferred to Cebu late in October.

Cabangbang deserted the constabulary, fled to Bohol and joined the guerrillas.  Major Jesus Villamor, meanwhile, was sent by MacArthur from Australia to Negros Island to set up a radio station and spy network in the Philippines.  He sent for Cabangbang and on 10/23/43 Villamor and Cabangbang departed Negros for Australia aboard the U.S. sub "Cabrilla."

In Australia Cabangbang was promoted to First Lieutenant, trained as a commando, and placed in charge of a "penetration party," consisting of five Filipino intelligence/signal teams, and on 8/6/44 he and his men departed for Luzon aboard Chick Parsons' submarine "Narwhal."

On Luzon, he was at first associated with Captain Bernard Anderson's guerrillas in Tayabas Province, then moved to Alejandro Santos' Bulacan guerrillas just north of Manila.  Over the next couple of months he effectively brought an end to the squabbling that had been going on between the American and Filipno guerrilla leaders, and set up a radio network throughout central Luzon that communicated intelligence data back to MacArthur's headquarters.  MacArthur promoted him to Captain.  He had observation posts in Manila itself, and was in contact with some of the underground there.  Prior to the above messages I never heard of him being in contact with or smuggling anything into Santo Tomas.  However, some of the information that led the 1st Cavalry's "Flying Column" to Santo Tomas may have come through Cabangbang.

After liberation he requested a transfer back to flight school, then the war ended.  I understand that later in life he was elected to the Philippine legislature.

One other note, in the interest of accuracy--Santo Tomas was definitely no Camp O'Donnell.  It was more like the internment camps where Japanese-Americans were confined in the U.S.  However, the gates were not open to the public, and only a few of the inmates were granted passes to go out into Manila, mostly for medical reasons.  Up until 1944, Filipinos were freely allowed to bring packages to the gates for their friends inside.  However, by the time Cabangbang returned to Luzon the Japanese had shut off the "package line," and anything that he might have sent into Santo Tomas would have had to be smuggled.
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:50pm by Editor-at-Large »  
  IP Logged
Rainbow Trout  aka Sue
Full Member
***
Offline

Joy comes in the
morning

Posts: 125
Washington
Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #7 - May 23rd, 2004, 3:17am
 
Chris, That is  amazing! What else do you have on Tommy? Thank you.  Sue
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:49pm by Editor-at-Large »  
WWW emerald_trout@yahoo.com   IP Logged
Rainbow Trout  aka Sue
Full Member
***
Offline

Joy comes in the
morning

Posts: 125
Washington
Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #8 - May 23rd, 2004, 3:22am
 
[quote author=Newsletter Editor link=board=Scouts;num=1084938736;start=0#5 date=05/21/04 at 16:28:44]I was acquainted with a Fred Gallager ... Clyde quote]  

Thank you for the alert Clyde; they are different people. Sue
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:48pm by Editor-at-Large »  
WWW emerald_trout@yahoo.com   IP Logged
Editor-at-Large
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 421
Ohio
Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #9 - Jan 3rd, 2005, 7:06pm
 
Chris Schaefer, in his new book Bataan Diary: An American Family in World War II, 1941-1945, devotes a full chapter to Capt. Cabangbang.  The book, an excellent read,  is currently available as a $14.95 paperback through Amazon.com.  It will be reviewed on our PSHS website in the next week or two.  Editor
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:48pm by Editor-at-Large »  

Newsletter Editor
  IP Logged
Arlene Cabangbang-Castana
Guest




Re: Capt B. C. "Tommy" Cabangbang, WWII
Reply #10 - Jan 18th, 2005, 10:38pm
 
I would like to make a correction:  Capt Cabangbang's full name is Bartolome C. Cabangbang.  
Back to top
 
« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2005, 1:48pm by Editor-at-Large »  
  IP Logged
Pages: 1
Send Topic Print